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Should the UK be In or Out of Europe?

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d)
Topic: This Europe Stuff (Read 97500 times) previous topic - next topic
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Re: This Europe Stuff

Reply #3240
Not my work, but I liked this:

I don't know for sure, but to me it looks like 52% voted for a unicorn. Then the government agreed that a unicorn hunt was to be arranged, and May leapt at the chance to lead it, even though she herself did not believe in unicorns.  She brought in the top unicorn hunters in the land, men and women who had often seen unicorns, or wizards who knew where they could be found. The views of those who said that unicorns were not real were dismissed because the people had said they wanted a unicorn.

Now mid hunt, the unicorn is proving very elusive. A donkey has been found, and maybe with a horn and some glue...

But the better thing, the high integrity thing, would surely be to tell the people the truth about unicorns.

I don't get it.

Re: This Europe Stuff

Reply #3241
Donny and Rich B have been played like a f*cking trumpet. The Brexiteers have sucked and blown them dry by blaming everything thing they don't like or understand about the modern world (gay marriage, decimal coinage, tippy-tappy football, newsreaders wearing the hijab) on "Brussels" before planning to create a low skill, low tax state that will f*ck Donny's nephew's job prospects for the next 30 years. (Unless he wants a career in fruit picking.)

Re: This Europe Stuff

Reply #3242
Donny and Rich B have been played like a f*cking trumpet. The Brexiteers have sucked and blown them dry by blaming everything thing they don't like or understand about the modern world (gay marriage, decimal coinage, tippy-tappy football, newsreaders wearing the hijab) on "Brussels" before planning to create a low skill, low tax state that will f*ck Donny's nephew's job prospects for the next 30 years. (Unless he wants a career in fruit picking.)

It's no coincidence that Donny and Rich B are both retired on index-linked pensions that they believe can't be touched.

I don't think, by the way, that the Brexiteers want to create a low skill economy. The model for most tory brexiteers is to be something like Singapore, which, while low taxed and lightly regulated, certainly isn't low-skilled. Or possible to apply to Britain.

Re: This Europe Stuff

Reply #3243
Exactly. Singaporeans now how to put a shift in. This country is packed full of lazy c*nts out to see what they can get for doing bugger all.
The hardest thing of all is to find a black cat in a dark room, especially if there is no cat.

 

Re: This Europe Stuff

Reply #3244
It's no coincidence that Donny and Rich B are both retired on index-linked pensions that they believe can't be touched.

I don't think, by the way, that the Brexiteers want to create a low skill economy. The model for most tory brexiteers is to be something like Singapore, which, while low taxed and lightly regulated, certainly isn't low-skilled. Or possible to apply to Britain.

Singapore lightly regulated? I worked in the banking sector there for quite a while and the regulation was anything but light. I'm not sure how that equates to the rest of the Singaporean economy. But in any case the idea of taking the UK workforce and instilling the Singaporean work ethic is laughable; as I'm sure you know.

Re: This Europe Stuff

Reply #3245
Singapore lightly regulated? I worked in the banking sector there for quite a while and the regulation was anything but light. I'm not sure how that equates to the rest of the Singaporean economy. But in any case the idea of taking the UK workforce and instilling the Singaporean work ethic is laughable; as I'm sure you know.

It's an international financial hub, so I assume it's subject to the regulations of any country its servicing. I was thinking more of labour regulations. I have no real knowledge, it may well be that they have great entitlements to sick pay, maternity pay, minimum wage, etc. But I'm guessing not.


Re: This Europe Stuff

Reply #3247
Unbelievable (and presumably a proven liar now?). Just get on with it, whatever the totally unknown cost. La-la-la can't hear you.

He's attempting to split the difference between a "sectoral analysis" and an "impact assessment". Not sure how the former can be complete without the latter, especially when he'd previously said they were in "excruciating detail" but there it is.


Re: This Europe Stuff

Reply #3249
Unbelievable (and presumably a proven liar now?). Just get on with it, whatever the totally unknown cost. La-la-la can't hear you.

I think it's amazing he is still in the job. If ever there was direct evidence of a mahoosive lie - one that was discussed at length in Parliament no less. This is it.

Now, when May did a switch on her policy during their election campaign, it was a U-turn that was covered up by an amateurish play-on-words which implied they had been misunderstood. That was just some campaign item though where the rapid reversal didn't *really* make any difference (although should have ruined their credibility more than it did), but this is a whole other category of f*ck up that they are using the same technique to avoid.

The more that comes out about all this, the more hope I have that eventually some sort of common sense will prevail, as surely even the most hardened Brexiteer (bar the racist ones) must be seeing what a f*cking disaster this is and that it is being overseen by f*cking idiots.
The inside of a Halex Three-Star table-tennis ball smells much like you'd expect it to

Re: This Europe Stuff

Reply #3250
The more that comes out about all this, the more hope I have that eventually some sort of common sense will prevail, as surely even the most hardened Brexiteer (bar the racist ones) must be seeing what a f*cking disaster this is and that it is being overseen by f*cking idiots.

@donnyred and @Rich B - can you see yet what a f*cking diaster this is and that it is being overseen by idiots?

Re: This Europe Stuff

Reply #3251
@donnyred and @Rich B - can you see yet what a f*cking diaster this is and that it is being overseen by idiots?
I wish I could be convinced that they were just idiots. I worry about the game plan. They're up to something.
Not Davis, obviously, he is probably just a lying moron.

Re: This Europe Stuff

Reply #3252
Does yesterday mark the point where Theresa May can no longer fudge and offer platitudes or will she find a way to kick the can a few more months down the road in the hope something will turn up?

Indeed it does. We are reaching the point where the cheques backed by fantasy are now being bounced by reality. It was always going to come to this at some point.
There are deep issues everywhere, but the N. Ireland issue is a big one. Even before the general election which was supposed to lock in the Maybot's hegemony there would have been trouble, but now that the DUP have the power to bring down the government it is exponetially more difficult.
To sum up the basic problems:
Neither DUP or Sinn Fein want a broder in Ireland. This is a red line for DUP and SF
Sinn Fein would accept a border between N. Ireland and the UK, but this is a red line for the DUP
The DUP will not accept different terms for N. Ireland and the rest of the UK.
The Maybot has stated her own red lines as leaving the Customs Union, leaving the Single Market and no jusristiction for the ECJ.

Now, how do you come up with a solution for the only land border the UK will have with the EU given these restrictions? Even the DUP is split on the issue. Although the official line is no border in Ireland, there are elements within the DUP who do not care, such as Dodds (the leader in the HoC).
There is an uneasy alliance between the hardline Tory Brexit mob and the DUP, but this cannot prevail. John Redwood's solution is to simply revert to WTO rules but leave the border open in Ireland and impose no tariffs. This is the JR solution to everything; basically say we will not impose any tariffs or quotas on imports. Economic suicide for two reasons: first, it would allow dumping of products into the UK market and kill off many industries in the UK. Second, it would remove any power we may have in future trade negotations; what incentive would a trading partner have to give us access to their markets when they already have unfettered access to ours? Relying on goodwill is a pathetic option.

Now, it was always possible that the EU would agree a fudge whereby N. Ireland and Ireland could operate as a special case and so retain freedom of movement. Clearly this is not possible due to the DUP who now hold the balance of power in Westminster. Would the DUP really vote down the government if this was imposed? I believe they would. Some may claim that they would not want to risk a Corbyn government, but those people seriously underestimate the sheer bloodymindedness of the DUP. They are utterly intransigent, inflexible and self-serving as demonstrated by the fact that they still have not come up with a power-sharing government for Northern Ireland. It's worth remembering that this is primarily because Arlene Foster is heavily implicated in a corruption scandal and refuses to stand aside.
Given that their leader will not stand aside in order to allow a government to form in Stormont, what makes people think they would not bring down the UK government?
The result is that the Maybot may have to cave in on more of her so-called red lines. The only solution seems to be to remain in the Customs Union which is then likely to fall foul of the hardline brexiters in the Tory party and will preclude the UK from making any trade deals. The other option is for the EU to grant further concessions, but I suspect that the agreement reached on Monday was as far as they were willing to go on this point. We shall see.

There may be a way out of this, but I suspect that it will require yet more concession from the Maybot; at some point we will reach a situation where we think "What is the f*cking point of leaving?"


Re: This Europe Stuff

Reply #3254
Interesting read.


John Redwood's solution is to simply revert to WTO rules but leave the border open in Ireland and impose no tariffs.

I thought[1][2] that one of the WTO rules specifically required that a border with customs controls was a pre-requisite to trading under WTO rules. I suppose the logical extension (we don't trade with the EU at all) makes perfect sense to to anyone who seriously thinks there's any economic upside to this; so not that surprising then.


I read it on Facebook, it might be bollocks
But f*ck it, I suspect John Redwood has no more idea what the WTO rules actually are than anyone else nominally in charge of this farce