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Poll

Where's your vote going?

Tory
[ 4 ] (12.1%)
Labour
[ 12 ] (36.4%)
Lib Dem
[ 12 ] (36.4%)
Brexit
[ 1 ] (3%)
Green
[ 1 ] (3%)
SNP
[ 0 ] (0%)
Plaid
[ 1 ] (3%)
Someone I've forgotten
[ 2 ] (6.1%)

Total Members Voted: 33

Voting closes: December 13, 2019, 11:19:04 am

Topic: Election 2019 (Read 4061 times) previous topic - next topic
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Re: Election 2019

Reply #360
Quick reminder for this Brexit election.

Brexit still isn’t...
• defined
• costed
• agreed
• endorsed by the public
• worth it
• anywhere close to being ‘done’
• ever going to be anything other than sh!t.

Re: Election 2019

Reply #361
First you have to cast it.

I don't understand people who are engaged and have strong opinions, but don't vote.

I've never had a FPTP vote that was going to count. I've never supported whoever was definitely going to win.. but when I lived in the UK I never once missed I poll I was eligible to vote in. Where there was nobody I was willing to vote for I turned up and spoiled my ballot.

The voting system dictates who gets to govern. But patterns and percentages impact the narrative and directions of travel. And people who want a fairer voting system really need to get out and cast their votes to continue to show up the current one for the arse that it is.
this is an excellent rectangle

Re: Election 2019

Reply #362
But surely they do have to take some responsibility, they could choose to spend more on these matters. Also don't Scotland have tax raising powers? They certainly have different tax rates to the rest of the UK, they could choose to do something about it that way.

By far the most common reason for food bank referrals is benefits not having been paid. I don't believe the sh!tshow that is the benefits system is anything that the Scots parliament can fix up.

I wasn't going to do the counterpoint on food banks.. but I'm here now.. so basically this.. food banks are not a problem, they are a solution to a problem. They shouldn't be required.. that problem should not exist.. so I'm not saying that they are a good thing or anything like that. I'm glad that they exist, but I wish they didn't.

But I read a lot about the rise of food banks (and now 'baby food banks'.. which I'm discounting as a bit of a PR stunt because food banks have always needed to provide for babies and children) but their rise tells us nothing about how the underlying problem is changing. Growth can just as easily show that more is being done to address the problems that were always there.

Why does that matter, you ask? Well because if we assume that food banks are only a response to Tory Austerity then we kid ourselves into thinking that getting rid of Tory Austerity will mean that there's no need for food banks. The problem will be solved. But it won't. Because the ability of the dole office to get it's sh!t together and pay people what they're due has been an open joke my whole life. The ever increasing complexity of the welfare system and the government's failure to have it keep up with the realities of life extends long before the GFC and government responses to it.

I've not yet read what Labour propose to do about this. I hold all previous governments accountable, and I do reserve special ire for the Tories, and their supporters, who stoke up the atmosphere of welfare shaming upon which all of the functional shortcomings in the system are built. I would be optimistic that a Corbyn government might make things better (cos if he wouldn't then what's the actual point of him anyway?)
this is an excellent rectangle

Re: Election 2019

Reply #363
@noodlé your last point is very pertinent. The manifesto has not yet been released (next weekend I think), but you're correct that if it does not address the issues you mention then what's the point? It's a bit like the phoney war at the moment.

Re: Election 2019

Reply #364
The Johnson failed to lay a wreath the right way up at the cenotaph. The BBC, as state broadcaster, have helped out by showing footage of him managing to do the simple thing right instead, from 2016.

Never mind the report on Russian involvement on interfering in our elections, what chance of a fair unbiased election anyway in our deeply corrupt propoganda state?

Re: Election 2019

Reply #365
It's incredible really that as far as I can see so far, even ignoring the completely vile individual acts of leading Tories like Rees-Mogg and Bridgen, we have:
- Johnson refusing to release a report that evidences Rusian interference in elections and implicates Johnson and his government
- The police delaying an investigation into electoral fraud in which Johnson is implicated
- And delaying an inquiry into Johnson's alleged misconduct in giving public money to someone he was having an affair with
- Sajid Javid making up numbers about the cost of Labour's election pledges (but being reported like they're true) whilst also
- Refusing to cost the implications of his own parties Brexit policy because it's such a monumental f*ck up for the country

And yet they'll probably still win, or at least be the largest party as people try desperately to convince themselves there is no other choice than to vote for these w@nkers.



Re: Election 2019

Reply #366
Not really an Election topic, but I'm a bit alarmed that news media aren't connecting two of the day's main stories: a Chinese company buying British Steel; and the riots in Hong Kong, caused by China's hardline attitudes to one of our former colonies.

I'm probably being stupid and/or racist here, but this rings alarm bells for me. Allowing China to have more influence in our affairs (see: nuclear power) will ultimately prove to be a f*cking crazy thing to have done.

Re: Election 2019

Reply #367

- Sajid Javid making up numbers about the cost of Labour's election pledges (but being reported like they're true) whilst also


Don't disagree with the others, but the BBC news last night did question the figures and also showed the Business minister looking a bit shifty on being asked if they had costed their own proposals and effectively confirming that they hadn't

Re: Election 2019

Reply #368
Don't disagree with the others, but the BBC news last night did question the figures and also showed the Business minister looking a bit shifty on being asked if they had costed their own proposals and effectively confirming that they hadn't
 The tory government doesn't need to cost it's proposals, because it doesn't actually intend to do them.  Remember hospitals, and affordable homes?

Re: Election 2019

Reply #369
This is going to be a hung parliament, Farage is expected to take at least 11% of the vote. He will certainly reduce the Tory vote in the hard leave areas and will do the same in the Labour voting leave areas. In my view Farage may ensure we remain as I don't think the Tory's will have enough seats to get their leave deal through thanks to Farage. A Lib Lab partnership looks unlikely as the Liberals will only support Labour minus Corbyn. The SNP may support Labour but will it be enough to form a government. Whatever it's all going to be very messy and Farage will be the cause.

Looks like Farage doesn't share your confidence in his popularity and is standing down a significant number of candidates.

Re: Election 2019

Reply #370
Which is bad news. Ugh.

Re: Election 2019

Reply #371
If the young and/or disenfranchised who need any more reason to register to vote and actually vote - this is it
I wouldn't recommend being a student to anyone.....
.......except to students

Re: Election 2019

Reply #372
I get how Farage's decision will help the Tories to hang onto seats - but I don't get how it takes any seats away from Labour. Surely, the Tories and Brexit Party will just split the leave vote in those constituencies?

Re: Election 2019

Reply #373
If the young and/or disenfranchised who need any more reason to register to vote and actually vote - this is it

Well, the disenfranchised can't register or vote. That's what it means.

Apparently, he's stood down in the seats the Tories won last time, which, unless I'm missing something[1], doesn't necessarily help Boris much, given a strategy of offsetting his remainy losses in the SE and Scotland by winning some leavey Labour seats in the midlands and north.


Always the most likely explanation

Re: Election 2019

Reply #374
Meanwhile in Bolivia.
The hardest thing of all is to find a black cat in a dark room, especially if there is no cat.