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Smells Fishy

Following an unfortunate incident in Pets at Home caused by some very prominent Peppa Pig branding and shelf stacking designed with the pig-centric toddler in mind I am now the main stakeholder in 25 quids worth of aquarium (aquary-arium to those ITK). Cosmic. Anybody on here keep tropical fish? What's the path of least resistance/expense here? We'd get away with plastic fish for a bit but would still have to buy food to 'feed' them with so might as well do it properly. 
The hardest thing of all is to find a black cat in a dark room, especially if there is no cat.

Re: Smells Fishy

Reply #1
Useless f*ckers
The hardest thing of all is to find a black cat in a dark room, especially if there is no cat.

Re: Smells Fishy

Reply #2
Stick in a couple of trout, breed and eat? Life lessons can be learnt...

Re: Smells Fishy

Reply #3
I think the obvious answer is to keep the toddler in the aquarium. Maybe put a little plastic castle and an old time diving suit in there to keep her interested, and add some colourful gravel in the bottom to make it look nice. Probably best not to put water in though.
Outside it's 1933, so I'm hitting the bar

Re: Smells Fishy

Reply #4
You have to cycle a tropical tank first.

You can use a few hardier fish to do this for you, but you will expose them to a lot of ammonia and likely kill them. Your toddler may find issues with this method. Fishless cycling is more humane but requires a lot of waiting before you can add shiny fish.

In short, I think Russ's suggestion is the one to go with.

Re: Smells Fishy

Reply #5
We had Goldfish - within a month the plastic tank was all scratched and it was hard to see the fish. We bought a cleaner fish (Gladys) who worker her little socks off and then died whilst the goldfish just swam about sh!tting (a metaphor for something?)

Re: Smells Fishy

Reply #6
I can let you have a few trout, if that helps. They're dead but would look realistic if you weighted them down and had them sort of peeping out from a bit of weed.

Re: Smells Fishy

Reply #7
Might have to curve it around, the tanks not massive.
The hardest thing of all is to find a black cat in a dark room, especially if there is no cat.

Re: Smells Fishy

Reply #8
As Brett says, you'll need to cycle the water first, which (a long time ago now) I did using the filter from an existing tank (basically 2nd hand bog roll for fish. They don't mind swimming in a bit of their own filth, but not too much of it).

Once ready, what fish would little miss ingo prefer?

Easy ones to keep are guppies, though be warned:- They like to breed, and whilst it is nice to see little bubbas swimming around, after the third round of in-breeding your tank will start to resemble the creche at Meadow Lane.

Tetras are also cheap, and more colourful, but less likely to reproduce.

These smaller fish you would have in groups, and they each look alike, so naming each one is out.

Slightly bigger fish - Platys and Mollies can also be colourful, and more individual. They also like to get it on, but just as likely will scoff any offspring if you don't separate them well (you can buy a small floating tank for the babies)

Other than that, we've kept (at different times) Gouramis, Cichlids and still have an Angelfish. These along with Bettas and others can be territorial, so if you go for a mixed tank, use the compatibility charts available.

Lastly, you can also get a pleco or two, as these are good at eating up algae and decomposing fish-sh!t. If you get more than one though, again beware, as they breed like f*ck.



Re: Smells Fishy

Reply #9
Fill it with San Miguel, stick a tap on the side and you've got yourself a beerium.

Re: Smells Fishy

Reply #10
As Brett says, you'll need to cycle the water first, which (a long time ago now) I did using the filter from an existing tank (basically 2nd hand bog roll for fish. They don't mind swimming in a bit of their own filth, but not too much of it).

Once ready, what fish would little miss ingo prefer?

Easy ones to keep are guppies, though be warned:- They like to breed, and whilst it is nice to see little bubbas swimming around, after the third round of in-breeding your tank will start to resemble the creche at Meadow Lane.

Tetras are also cheap, and more colourful, but less likely to reproduce.

These smaller fish you would have in groups, and they each look alike, so naming each one is out.

Slightly bigger fish - Platys and Mollies can also be colourful, and more individual. They also like to get it on, but just as likely will scoff any offspring if you don't separate them well (you can buy a small floating tank for the babies)

Other than that, we've kept (at different times) Gouramis, Cichlids and still have an Angelfish. These along with Bettas and others can be territorial, so if you go for a mixed tank, use the compatibility charts available.

Lastly, you can also get a pleco or two, as these are good at eating up algae and decomposing fish-sh!t. If you get more than one though, again beware, as they breed like f*ck.

Platys was the thinking, give or take a slight issue with how it's pronounced. Is it like a collection of fish-faces or is it the kids word for crockery? How often do they make more fish?

Mixed tank sounds like getting a bit carried away but I like the idea of the sh!t hover thing. We'll get one of those.
The hardest thing of all is to find a black cat in a dark room, especially if there is no cat.

Re: Smells Fishy

Reply #11
Zebra danios are a good choice when first stocking a fish tank. They seem to be able to survive most of what's thrown at them while the biological filtration process is taking hold.

You can also claim them to be a distant relative of Zoe Zebra... maybe.

 

Re: Smells Fishy

Reply #12
Liking that, no maybe about it.
The hardest thing of all is to find a black cat in a dark room, especially if there is no cat.